Moulin Rouge, by Louis Anquetin. 🎨A canvas inspired in one

Moulin Rouge, by Louis Anquetin. 🎨A canvas inspired in one

9/6/2021, 4:02:37 PM
Moulin Rouge, by Louis Anquetin. 🎨A canvas inspired in one of Toulouse-Lautrec, who the artist met in Leon Bonnat’s studio a few years later. Despite their friendship, his styles developed in different directions over the years. In fact, Anquetin with Emile Bernard are the maximum representatives of a style that at the time began to be called cloisonism. A technique that consisted of clearly delimiting the coloured areas of each part of a figure or thing with black contours. A technique also worked by other artists such as Vincent Van Gogh himself, and which in some way was indebted to the venerated Japanese prints so coveted at the time. Although it is also related to the stained glass windows of medieval churches, where each image is built from lead lines. However, that spirit of modernity in the case of Anquetin was gradually diluted. 👨‍🎨Louis Anquetin (French, 1861-1932) was a painter belonging to the Pont-Aven school, one of the most influential French post-impressionist movements and known for his popping colours and eye-catching compostions. He joined the Parisian circles through Leon Bonnat, where he met Toulouse-Lautrec whom he accompanied through the cabarets of Montmartre. When the teacher closed his course in 1883, they turned to another academic artist, Fernand Cormon, whose workshop was to become a true melting pot for artists. He then continued his studies with Claude Monet at Giverny. In 1887 Bernard and Antequin recede from impressionism and use thick black stripes in their paintings that began to delimit increasingly flat areas chromatically. Eventually the Pont-Aven school turned into a new movement itself, the Nabis, and Anquetin became interested in decorative-like practices such as pointillism and cloisonism, a new trend that had great impact at the Volpini Café and found inspiration in stained glass and ukiyo-e. He turned towards realism at the end of his life, following the steps of Courbet and Daumier. 📐Height: 168.3 cm (66.2 in). Width: 206.4 cm (81.2 in). Oil on canvas, 1893. 🏛Private collection. What do you think about this? Share and follow @monteroneart for a daily 🎨!

Related posts