Do you know what to call the dramatic contrasts in these

8/27/2021, 4:23:23 PM
Do you know what to call the dramatic contrasts in these paintings? The answer is tenebrism, and I just released a video discussing the use of tenebrism in art history and how it differs from chiaroscuro. See the link in my bio. Tenebrism was particularly popular during the Baroque period, and it was a technique to make the scenes much more dramatic than before. The paintings shown here are all examples of this style, and from left to right they are: 1. Smiling Girl, a Courtesan, Holding an Obscene Image (1625) by Gerrit van Honthorst 2. David with the Head of Goliath (c. 1610) by Caravaggio 3. The Magdalen with the Smoking Flame (c. 1636) by Georges de la Tour 4. Saint Jerome (1652) by José de Ribera In the video, I will also compare the use of tenebrism to the related concept of chiaroscuro. These terms are often confused, and I will illustrate with ample examples what their differences are, and why some paintings include both techniques. #Art #Painting #Artwork #ArtHistory #HistoryofArt #OilPainting #OilonCanvas #FineArts #ArtoftheDay #Tenebrism #Chiaroscuro #ArtVideo #ArtLecture #Amuze #ArtTalk #AmuzeArtLectures #Caravagggio #DeLaTour #VanHonthorst #DeRibera #Baroque #BaroqueArt

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