Amalie Zuckerkandl, by Gustav Klimt.⁠ 🎨Miriam Amalie

Amalie Zuckerkandl, by Gustav Klimt.⁠ 🎨Miriam Amalie

8/24/2021, 9:00:53 AM
Amalie Zuckerkandl, by Gustav Klimt.⁠ 🎨Miriam Amalie Schlesinger was born in 1869 and converted to Judaism in 1895 to marry the reputed surgeon Otto Zuckerkandl. Thanks to this marriage she befriended Gustav Klimt, who was popular among the medical community. Klimt began to work on this portrait of Amalie but passed away before it was completed. There are some drawings made by Klimt from 1914 so the portrait could be commissioned a year earlier. However, the outbreak of World War I brought Amalie to Lvov, where she accompanied her husband by working as a nurse in a field hospital. The fact that this painting remains unfinished symbolizes the decline of Klimt's aesthetics and of the world that he represented, as the artistic elite ceased to exist after the end of the War. In 1942, the Nazis deported Amalie Zuckerkandl with her daughter to Theresienstadt and she presumably herself died in the Belzec death camp.⁠ 👨‍🎨Gustav Klimt (Austrian, 1862-1918), son of a gold engraver, was born to the prosperity of the ever-bourgeois Vienna, a centre of artistic and intellectual innovations slowly heading to decay. With easy access to patronage and fostering of decorative arts, Klimt was already successful before his 30s. Then he joined Secessionsstil, the anti-academic movement of the time, losing some of his security to become the most complex and cryptic artist of his time. Crowded with enticing colour, geometrical motives and expressive lines, Klimt's muses were often their own in real life. He had at least 14 children (probably more, as we know of these through the alimonies), none under wedlock, and his women were responded to the archetype of femme fatale preferably redheads. It was Freud's time around Vienna, so the ease with which critics faulted Klimt as a pornographer is no surprise. An eclectic figure amidst symbolism and art nouveau. ⁠ 📐Height: 128 cm (50.3 in). Width: 128 cm (50.3 in). Oil on canvas, 1917.⁠ 🏛Österreichische Galerie, Vienna. What do you think about this? ⁠ Share and follow @monteroneart for a daily 🎨!

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