Mermaid (1900) is a mysterious painting by John William

Mermaid (1900) is a mysterious painting by John William

6/13/2021, 5:30:56 PM
Mermaid (1900) is a mysterious painting by John William Waterhouse (1849-1917). Mermaids were a particular fascination for 19th-century British artists. Sometimes they were depicted in the role of the mythological Sirens who lured sailors to their death. At other times, they were depicted in the role we know them best for, like from the fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen or one of the many 19th-century poems written about them. And sometimes, the artist leaves it in the middle. The singing mermaid here is combing out her long hair. She clearly has a fish tail, but there are no desperate sailors present. However, next to her is a shell with pearls in it, which some people interpret as representing the tears of the dead sailors. According to the Royal Academy of Arts (where the painting is on display) is probably was inspired by a poem written by Alfred Lord Tennyson, which contains the following lines: Who would be A mermaid fair, Singing alone, Combing her hair The poem continues by describing that she will eventually find someone that will marry her: Of the bold merry mermen under the sea. They would sue me, and woo me, and flatter me, In the purple twilights under the sea; But the king of them all would carry me, Woo me, and win me, and marry me. #Art #Painting #Artwork #ArtHistory #HistoryofArt #OilPainting #OilonCanvas #Waterhouse #BritishArt #BritishPainter #BritishArtist #Poetry #Poem #Tennyson #LordTennyson #Mermaid #Mermen #Beauty #Sirens #Mythology #GreekMythology

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