Maxfield Parrish (1870-1966), Moonlight – Deep Snow, 1944

Maxfield Parrish (1870-1966), Moonlight – Deep Snow, 1944

11/27/2021, 3:33:36 PM
Maxfield Parrish (1870-1966), Moonlight – Deep Snow, 1944, oil on panel, 13 1/2” x 15 1/2” Everyone recognizes the magical world woven by Parrish, usually with the color lapiz lazuli in its purest form. His signature use of this color was so powerful that a certain cobalt blue became known as "Parrish Blue". His idealized images with figures of feminine pulchritude adorned in classical gowns with backgrounds of electric violets, radiant reds and rich glowing earth tone pigments, created an idyllic world indeed. During the difficult economic and political period that followed in the 1930s and 1940s, Parrish focused on vivid landscapes drawn from New England and the American Southwest. Brilliantly realized paintings such as Cobble Hill (1931), Moonlight Night: Winter (1942), Hunt Farm (1948), and the present work from 1944 demonstrate not only Parrish’s masterly technique, but also a broader preoccupation with regional and national identity. Many of these images were reproduced on calendars and greeting cards.

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