Giorgione (Giorgio Barbarelli da Castelfranco) (c

Giorgione (Giorgio Barbarelli da Castelfranco) (c

2/6/2021, 11:22:29 AM
Giorgione (Giorgio Barbarelli da Castelfranco) (c. 1477/8–1510): Tempest, 1506-08, Oil on canvas, 82 x 73 cm, Gallerie dell'Accademia, Venice . With Giovanni Bellini and Vittore Carpaccio as examples in his early training and with his attentive interest in Northern European painting of Belgium Venetian Renaissance painter, Giorgione used a naturalistic language. Colour attains to new all-important powers of expression of the poetic equivalence of man and nature in a single, fearful apprehension of the cosmos. The finest of all expressions of this new vision of the world is the 'Tempest'. A break away from religious subject matter, practically every image in this painting is open to many interpretations, though none of them is totally convincing. Thus the mystery remains of what exactly the significance is of the fascinating landscape caught at this particular atmospheric moment, the breaking of a storm. Anxious waiting seems to characterize the mood of both the human figures, absorbed in private reveries, and every other detail, from the little town half-hidden behind the luxuriant vegetation and the lazy, tortuous course of the stream to the ancient ruins, the houses, the towers and the buildings in the distance which pale against the blue of the sky. The fascination of the painting arises from the pictorial realization of the illustrative elements. In the vibrant brightness which immediately precedes the breaking of the storm the chromatic values follow one another in fluid gradations achieved by the modulation of the tones in the fused dialectic of light and shadow in an airy perspective of atmospheric value within a definite space. Completely liberated from any subjection to drawing or perspective, colour is the dominant value in a new spacial-atmospheric synthesis which is fundamental to the art of painting in its modern sense.

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