Mihály Munkácsy (1844–1900): The Condemned Cell (II.)

Mihály Munkácsy (1844–1900): The Condemned Cell (II.)

9/8/2021, 2:23:40 PM
Mihály Munkácsy (1844–1900): The Condemned Cell (II.) (cropped), 1880, oil on canvas119 x 170.5 cm(46.9 x 67.1 in), Hungarian National Gallery, Budapest Nineteenth century visual art or the historical developments of Hungarian art cannot be discussed without considering Munkácsy's lifework. His works are considered the apogee of national painting. He was a standard-setter, an oeuvre of reference value. He was one of the few with whom the antiquated colour techniques of 19th century Austro-Hungarian painting reached its most powerful and most lavish expression. In 1869, Munkácsy painted his much acclaimed work The Last Day of a Condemned Man. This is considered his first masterpiece. The picture was rewarded with the Gold Medal of the Paris Salon in 1870. It made Munkácsy a popular painter in an instant. The work summarises torture caused by oppression, moral uncertainty and reactions to an impending tragic end in visual form. However, it aptly captures the capabilities of the Hungarian master in painting. Th painting we have here is a later version, this time, with so many accompaniers around the prisoner, sharing his exhaustion.

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