Jacques Louis David (1748 -1825): Portrait of Mademoiselle

Jacques Louis David (1748 -1825): Portrait of Mademoiselle

11/11/2021, 12:09:06 PM
Jacques Louis David (1748 -1825): Portrait of Mademoiselle Guimard as Terpsichore, between c. 1773 - 1775, oil on canvas, 195.5 × 120.5 cm (77 × 47.4 in) #David #JacquesLouisDavid #Art #Paintings #Painters #Arthistory #FrenchArt #pittore #pittura #pintor #pintura #peintre #peinture #Arte #artista #historyofart #Maler #Malerei #MademoiselleGuimard #masterpiece #masters #Portrait #Fragonard #painter #boucher #rococo This early period painting of Jacques Louis David is a rare example of his rococo style, 'Boucherian' works. When David desired to be a painter, he went to be an apprentice of François Boucher (1703–1770), the leading painter of the time, who was also a distant relative. Boucher was a Rococo painter, but tastes were changing, and the fashion for Rococo was giving way to a more classical style. Boucher decided that instead of taking over David's tutelage, he would send David to his friend Joseph-Marie Vien, a painter who embraced the classical reaction to Rococo. This life-sized portrait of the celebrated dancer and courtesan Marie-Madeleine Guimard (1743-1816) has long been the subject of a debate on the indefinite participation of Jacques-Louis David in its creation together with a great Rococo artist Jean-Honoré Fragonard. A recent examination of the work, however, reveals that it is unlikely to be merely a curious hybrid by two hands belonging to painters of different eras and sensibilities. More profitable than attempting to incorporate it awkwardly into the mature career of Fragonard, the last great painter of the ancién regime, would be to see the portrait as David's and his contemporaries saw it: the sparkling debut of a transformative genius who was soon to reimagine the art of painting in Europe for a new century. One of David's pupils, Étienne Delécluze once recounts that 'in 1799' David showed him the portrait, 'executed completely in the taste of Boucher,' remembering that David said that "the sight of this work was always doubly agreeable to him because it gave him an irrefutable proof of the reform that he had introduced into art."

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