André Derain: The Turning Road, L'Estaque, 1906, Museum of

André Derain: The Turning Road, L'Estaque, 1906, Museum of

4/6/2021, 10:56:46 AM
André Derain: The Turning Road, L'Estaque, 1906, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston #Painters #art #painting #fauvism #modernart #Derain #AndreDerain #Frenchart #colors #landscape #arthistory #pittore #pittura #pintor #pintura #peintre #peinture #Arte #artista #artwork #Maler #Malerei #oilpainting #artgallery #masterpiece #masters #artpiece #painting #painter The Turning Road, L’Estaque is one of the greatest examples of Fauvism. The canvas glows with intense colors: trees burst forth in flaming red, orange, and blue. Yellow, the color of sunlight, is everywhere. Estaque should be a warm town! Red and Yellow are considered warm tones, as is orange, and they seem to dominate the large canvas. There are blues and greens and hints of purple, too, but they seem to be mostly shadows. There is shade here, it isn’t just an arid desert awash in sun. These shadows temper the “weather” in the painting, but also help us distinguish where things are in the space. Human figures that are dispersed throughout the painting have no exact features. They are rendered in the most rudimentary manner. The heads, for example, are faceless circles. Derain’s freedom from the constraints of the “real world” is celebrated in this image. It is a fantasy in color, a place where reality is overrun by the decorative impulse. Fauvism is an art movement that lasted only a few years at the beginning of the 20th century mostly in France, and was dominated by colorful artworks by Derain, Matisse, and Vlaminck. A “fauve” is a wild beast in French, and the art critic who inadvertently named the short-lived “movement” found the intense use of color far too wild for his taste.

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